Snapshot: Applying Genomics to Prevent Organ Rejection and Other Transplantation Complications

February 1, 2016
Snapshot: Applying Genomics  to Prevent Organ Rejection and Other Transplantation Complications
iGeneTRAIN has collected more than 30,000 genetic samples from over a dozen companies around the world. They hope to identify potential risks weeks to months prior to surgery and to design interventional treatments—or even cures—for transplant rejection.

Brendan J. Keating, Ph.D.

Over 650,000 solid organ transplants have been performed in the United States over the past three decades, and it is estimated that nearly 4 million transplants have been performed worldwide. While there have been considerable advances in organ preservation, surgical techniques, and clinical management over the last two decades, the rates of acute rejection are still significant.

Furthermore, most patients are subjected to potent immunosuppression therapies (ISTs) for the remainder of their lives, and comorbidities from ISTs, such as new onset of diabetes after transplant (NODAT), nephrotoxicity, and liver damage are still major clinical issues. With increases in chronic conditions, including kidney disease and congestive heart failure, waiting lists for donor organs continue to expand above and beyond the pool of available organ donations.

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