U.S. Struggles to Overcome Disincentives to Practicing Precision Medicine

June 2, 2015
U.S. Struggles to Overcome Disincentives to Practicing Precision Medicine

Novel advances in personalized and precision medicine (PPM) could offer enormous gains in healthy life expectancy for Americans, but the incentives to develop them are weak, according to Victor Dzau, M.D., President of the U.S. Institute of Medicine. He and colleagues discussed PPM in an article (“New developments in personalized medicine could save billions of dollars in improved health”) in The Lancet.

PPM tailors medical treatment to the individual characteristics of each patient, according to their susceptibility to a particular illness. But PPM goes beyond just targeting therapies at individuals who are ill; it includes the ability to identify those at highest risk of developing a disease, and who would benefit most from prevention measures.

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